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The BBC has an  Interesting Article on how the economic crisis is leading to an emotional crisis in many men in the face of trouble providing for their families.  The report on a survey that found men are twice as likely currently to report having suicidal thoughts, half as likely to discuss their trouble with friends or family, and while experience mental health problems in roughly equal numbers with women, they go untreated far more often.

This is interesting to me for several reasons.  The suffering goes on largely in silence.  Men don’t use health care in general to the extent that women do and they absolutely don’t use mental health care to the same extent. Read the rest of this entry »

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A couple of the research blogs I follow lately have had some insight that really struck me as they fought off dualism in regards to the thorny issue of psychological vs. physical addiction and the brain, arguing that the elimination of mind and body distinctions is a good thing, as addictive pathways are real, physical represented by neuronal circuits.

This is an interesting argument, that collapsing psychology to the brain mechanisms brain can erase stigma by medicalizing it and making it a matter of physical function.    In addiction it makes quite a bit of sense.  We know what part of the brain is being stimulated, that dopamine reward pathways are building and feeding the habit.  The derogatory statement, “It’s all in your head,” remains technically true, but loses its bite when you can explain it in such a real and tangible way. Read the rest of this entry »

Mental Health blogs come in two different varieties, both of which appeal to me personally, as someone who lives with Major Depression, I do relate to those who are suffering through the same or similar issues.  My sidebar tends to focus on social phobia, anxiety and depression for this reason.  The internet can be a wonderful support group.  The professionals, on the other hand, are great just for their wisdom and productive advice.  They are of necessity more general, as blogs could never, ever substitute for working face to face, but they give me insight into the mind and discuss research, evidence and controversy..  In the end, I follow both.  Here are a few of the ones that really spoke to me and offer sage advice besides. Read the rest of this entry »

(A note- Please don’t worry, I am not psychotic, not really hearing voices.  I am just referring to the automatic thoughts and inward conversation we all have, even when we are unaware that we are doing it.)

I am starting to feel it now.  I am tired.

I am tired of politics.  I am tired of people talking at other people.  I am tired of trying to reach the unreachable.  I am tired of doing things I usually enjoy.  This is the world of depression and I fear it is creeping back. I am tired of blog shouting matches.  I am tired of others condemning others who condemn them back.  I am tired of man’s inhumanity to man.  I am tired of writing.  I even sucked the joy out of the Olympics in my last post.  I am tired of fear and its ugly effect on people.  I am tired of writing.  I am tired of trying to wrestle out the beautiful, praiseworthy, and good report out of what I find, what I read, and what I write. 

   The voice is getting loud.  The voice is a pessimist.  It finds fault with anything I do.  I can’t write anything because it will not be good enough.  There is nothing worth writing.  There is just weariness.   A while back John D. at storied mind wrote about how creativity has at times burst him out of depression.  All I feel right now is depression stamping out creativity. 

  Read the rest of this entry »

Many apologies for the light posting.  The beginning of the medical school year always seems to kick work demands up a notch.  I have something wonderful, insightful, and enthralling coming up as soon as I figure out what it is.  Until then, here is the collection of all the enthralling stuff I wish I could write.  Enjoy! Read the rest of this entry »

One of the first lessons a physician gets in caring for patients is the virtue of objectivity. “Doctors can’t afford to be too close to their patients.” They pound this into our heads. “It will cloud your clinical judgement.” “You will burn out.” “Your problems are not their problems.”

Something about that always seemed a little off with me. What doctor goes into medicine with NO expectation of knowing, connecting with and helping patients?

They claim it central to becoming a clinician. While critical thinking, pattern recognition and problem solving are central to the science of medicine, taken alone they neglect its soul. Read the rest of this entry »

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