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   Isabella Mori, at Change Therapy tagged me earlier this week to participate in Blog Action Day, October 15th, in a crusade to tackle one of the great plagues of mankind, Poverty.  I have been very extraordinarily busy this month and my blogging has suffered but I figure better late than never.

  It turns out that one simple thing we all can do is click.  Yes, you can fight poverty by surfing the internet.  I am told that Doctors without Borders, a charity that is currently leading the fight against poverty in the neglected regions as Darfur in the Sudan and in Haiti, can use your help in an internet bid to award the most voted charity 1 million dollars.   Please Click here to vote, or you can click here to head on over to Scott Schachters blog and learn more.

      My problem remains, I don’t know that I have anything earth shattering or enlightening to share on the subject.  I was feeling powerless and paralyzed until I read these words from author Gretchen Rubin at the Happiness project

One of the most important principles I’ve learned from my happiness research is that although we assume that we act because of the way we feel, often we feel because of the way we act.

This is a case where actions are more powerful than words.  My pessimistic side tells me that if there was an easy solution to this, I think we would likely have rid ourselves of it long ago.  That doesn’t change the fact that I CAN do something, earth changing or not.  So in the spirit of doing what I can, when I have no idea what I can do, other than give to worthy charities such as Oxfam, the Salvation Army, or the Humanitarian Aid fund of my church, I share this video. 

     This song was written by fellow Mormon Kurt Bestor and captures the poignancy of the problem from God’s perspective in a manner that will rip at your heartstrings.  Can you hear the prayer of the children? 

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     I welcome one and all again to my roundup of all that is well with my surfing the internet for hidden treasure of knowledge relating to all things mind, soul, and body.  This week I have great posts on death, death, and death.  Also parasitic stalkers, forbidden fruit, and Heavy Metal, and smell receptor farming to name just a few.  So dig in and enjoy the very best I could find- Read the rest of this entry »

It’s Baaack, I have scoured every corner of cyberspace, selflessly and tirelessly in a relentless, never ending search for that which enlightens on the subjects of mind, soul, and body and then I got tired and took a nap.  Anyway, here is the fruits of my labor, especially for you, the reader, I present the best of the Internet- Read the rest of this entry »

Well, well, well, welcome to Mind, Soul and Body’s 100th post.  I guess that makes my collection of gems found surfing the internet just over a quarter of my posts.  Most blogs have about a three month lifespan and I am happy to have surpassed that.  I wonder if that means I am in this for the long haul, at least for the rest of residency, which is coming up on the end of one long, long road.  This week was a very strong one on the medicine, brain, and soul internet and I had to leave out an unusual number of posts.  Without futher delay I present only the best of the blogosphere (IMHO)- 

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When I was in the third grade, I learned about this very cool thing called a bike-a-thon.  I could take my bike and by just riding it help cure cystic fibrosis, a disease that I had no idea what it was, but sure sounded bad.  In my idealistic eight year old mind this just seemed like it just having fun for a good cause, so I signed right up and went for it.

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My second grader sister heard about the same thing and decided she had to do it as well.  That was a pain.  This meant every pledge I went to get had to pledge equally to the both of us by royal decree of my mother.  I was irritated, but we both pluckily canvassed the small town of under 1,000 inhabitants, all of whom knew our family, and gathered pledges.  I knew no fear in those days, heck, I didn’t even realize knocking on doors asking for money is annoying in my innocence. 

    Pledges were made per mile and so the first question we were asked was how many miles we were going to bike.  I pulled the number twenty off the top of my head as it seemed a nice even number.  I still remember some of the amused, patronizing smiles as these wordly wise adults then penciled in their donation.  Our pledges piled up and we ran out of room to contain them, requiring extra pledge sheets.  What’s the harm in donating to a couple of naive kids playing grown up biking on their Schwinn’s after all.   Read the rest of this entry »

Welcome, welcome to another edition of the very best stuff to come to my attention online this week. There is something for everyone here, whether you want to laugh, cry, learn, or ponder life’s mysteries, have a seat and dig in. Read the rest of this entry »

His room was a shrine to his own memory, a eulogy for a still living, and breathing child. Pictures adorned the the door and the wall, smiling, vibrant, full of life. This boy last week was a healthy, happy, growing, developing two year old child. Colorful children’s crayon scribblings were placed at strategic intervals to liven up the cold, stark hospital room. Get well cards from extended family are also peppered around the walls. Over his crib, lies a recent portrait, the big smile and engaging eyes standing in stark contrast to the current blank stare. His limbs lay motionless, stiff, rigid, spastic, with toes pointed, betraying signs of a brain ravaged by lack of oxygen. He has been having seizures, with eye fluttering, and facial twitching about multiple times per day despite two anticonvulsant medications. This and breathing are the only spontaneous movements he makes. All this, the result of a single grape.

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In Child neurology we are required to do a year of adult neurology. This is a year of complete culture shock. Children’s hospitals and adult hospitals are two completely different worlds. It is interesting to see the adult neurology residents complain about how chipper and upbeat the pediatrics people are. This is an odd complaint, until you realize adult neurology residents feel completely out of their comfort zone in knowing how to manage the patient. fear and discomfort are only augmented by sleep deprivation and being pulled in several directions at once, as you tend to be on call, Perhaps they can be forgiven when they really find it difficult to draw enthusiasm when awoken at 3am to hear about some “kiddo.” For me, being out of my element with adult patients is an even greater culture shock. Going from chipper to somewhat cynical and demanding is worse than the other way around.

The culture shock is particularly profound the Neuro ICU. For one thing, it is a prime site for so many spectacularly horrific things. While children with neurlogic problems can be heartbreaking, somehow I manage to deal with it. There is something about dealing with severe traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, stroke and brain hemorrhage all day that is particularly soul killing. The place is just saturated with death and loss. It was here I came to understand the phenomenon in medicine that is gallows humor.

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